Carbon Dioxide

And its effect on learning environments

CO2

Exposure to excessive indoor carbon dioxide will impair learning, engagement and performance. The damaging levels are surprisingly low. The Learnometer sensor can detect levels between 400-5,000ppm ±75ppm or 10%.

Professor Heppell indicates that above as little as 1,000 parts per million CO2 will be inducing sleepiness, poor concentration with abnormal heart rate and nausea. Problems increase towards 5,000 ppm which many learning spaces often exceed daily. Our recommendation is no higher than 2,200 ppm

“Carbon Monoxide and Carbon Dioxide cannot be sensed by humans, both of course have the potential to kill, but at lower levels, CO2 will affect concentration.

Our pilot work suggested a correlation between absence / illness levels and high classroom CO2 levels (for staff and students) and we have been dismayed by the damaging levels we have observed in examination and test rooms. Learnometer logs and tracks the levels of CO, CO2 and particulate matter (“pollution”) to help you identify airflow issues and optimum levels for learning and performance.

A useful guide would be to be aware that above as little as 1,000 parts per million (and arguably lower still) CO2 will be inducing sleepiness, poor concentration with abnormal heart rate and nausea. Problems increase towards 5,000 ppm which is a workplace limit in most countries, but which, disappointingly, many learning spaces often exceed daily.

This 2015 study from the Harvard School of Public Health found that carbon dioxide (CO2) has a worse, direct and negative impact on human cognition and decision-making than was previously understood.”

Stephen Heppell

Learnometer Inventor